English Version

企業理念

1984年の設立時、弊社の在るべき将来像に想いを巡らせながら、社名、シンボルマーク、フィロソフィー、企業理念を制定しました。

私達は、社会とのかかわりあいの中で何を為すべきかを問い続け、日々新たに「革新と創造」のサービスを提供していきます。

この考え方は、P.F.ドラッカー教授の「革新とは単なる方法ではなく、新しい世界観を意味する」。
そして、1960年に刊行されたハーバード・ビジネス・レビューで、T.レビット教授が提唱した「マーケティング・マイオピア」*(近視眼的マーケティング)に深く感銘を受けて創作しました。
自らの存在意義を熟考していく過程で、受動的なデザイン会社ではなく、「革新と創造」に満ちたトータルなデザイン提案ができてこそ、未来永劫の存続を許されると確信したのです。

1984年11月制定



*T・レビット教授は、それまでの企業経営において支配的な考えであったモノづくり主義をやめ、「顧客満足の追求」を目的とするマーケティングで企業活動を行うべきと主張しました。
具体例として、米国の鉄道会社は、自らを「鉄道業」と定義したため、自動車や航空機出現の意味を理解できず衰退させてしまった。もし、輸送業と考えていたなら、鉄道で得た収益をもとに、いち早く自動車産業や航空機産業を興せたはずです。
また、ハリウッドの映画会社は自らを「映画産業」であると規定したため、テレビの出現が意味することに気づきませんでした。もし、「娯楽産業」と定義していたら・・・。
ビジネスレビューで発表された「経営者の近視眼が悲劇を招く」で、衰退する企業の間違いは、「顧客中心ではなく、製品中心であったからである」と述べています。

Japanese Version

Corporate Philosophy

When the company was formed in 1984, ART DESIGN CENTER devised a corporate name, logo, philosophy and beliefs with a future vision in mind.


We continue to ask ourselves what to do through integration with society, while providing fresh services for innovation and creation every day.

This vision was created after the founder was profoundly touched by the words of Peter Drucker (“Innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship. The act that endows resources with a new capacity to create wealth.”), as well as those contained in Marketing Myopia* (short-sighted marketing) suggested by Theodore Levitt in the Harvard Business Review published in 1960.
As the founder contemplated the company’s identity, he was convinced that only companies that were able to present total design proposals filled with innovation and creation – rather than just passive design firms – would be able to survive for eternity.

*Theodore Levitt argued that the focus of business activities should be shifted from manufacturing, which had been dominant in corporate management, to marketing, which aims at the pursuit of customer satisfaction.
For example, railroads in the U.S. were responsible for the decline of their industry. They had problems understanding what the emergence of automobiles and aircraft meant, because they had assumed themselves to be in the railroad business.
If they had defined their industry as the transportation business, they could have had created automobile and aircraft business early on based on their earnings from railroads.
Another example is Hollywood film companies. They were unable to understand what the emergence of TV meant, because they had defined their industry as the movie business.
Imagine what would have happened if they had thought they were in the entertainment business.
In Marketing Myopia published in the Harvard Business Review, Levitt wrote that companies in any declining industry were wrong because “they were product-oriented instead of customer-oriented.”